The Innocents (1961) Review

A startling turn of the screw. The dusk of desolate light. A groan, or a creak, emitting to a shallow and cryptic secret; one that pertains to this manor. Children who whisper shrouded secrets. A gazing face in the distance; a damnable presence. A psycho-experimental stare. The taste of dread. A shocking, atmospheric tunnel of ambiguity.

The Innocents is essentially Gothic horror coated in impeccable artistry by Jack Clayton. The chills are carefully weaved with an attention to the smallest detail in cinematography, lighting, and happenings. The atmosphere is cold and a sin not to fall in love with, while the dread that radiates from chilling shots is impossible not to fear. Its ambiguous ending is surely fitting; left as something for the audience to interpret. The love I have for this film is immense. The perfect psychological horror.

RATING: 10/10

the-innocents-1961-25661Dir. Jack Clayton
Wri. William Archibald and Truman Capote
Cast: Deborah Kerr, Peter Wyngarde, Michael Redgrave, Martin Stephens, Pamela Franklin

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