Psycho (1960) Review

Psycho is a film so inexplicably dangerous to viewers. It’s first act is an ingenious set-up; Alfred Hitchcock hooks in the audience only to throw them a colossal curve ball. Next, he shows them the ‘real’ picture, a murder-mystery both relentless and not. Suddenly, he intoxicates viewers with a jolt of revelation and dread. Hitchcock flattens their expectations and plays them like an organ.Psycho is the earliest form of ‘film’ I can think of that had the notion of cunningly toying with its audience while being extremely absorbing.

After the success of North By Northwest, Hitchcock decided to experiment. He hired a television crew and began shooting on $800,000, his film based on the 1959 novel of the same name. What he managed to craft was an unexpected classic; a pivotal point in cinema history. In Psycho, Hitchcock adjusts his tone and directs a darkly suspenseful horror, where pure film is crystal clear and everything is shockingly seamless. From its suave camera work to the excellent lighting and the twisted way it can intensify a scene, Psycho is a masterclass of art.

10/10

Dir. Alfred Hitchcock
Wri. Joseph Stefano
Starring: Vera Miles, Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh

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