The House on Sorority Row (1983) Review

1983. The American slasher craze is strong with a substantial amount of earnings at the box office and critics aren’t too over the moon. Its tropes are recycled and mildly juiced up, but oh so fun and bloody, so screw ’em. One of those films is about a Sorority dealing with a prank gone wrong. In fact, it ends in an accidental death, and one they decide to simply cover up and continue with their party planning. Maturer than its peers, The House on Sorority Row is simply what a slasher should be, just perhaps more sophisticated than some of the rest.

As expected, it opens with none other than a bleak and mysterious flashback, like any slasher will do. However, it’d be better without. Once its opening credits roll in, it’s apparent that it might not be the typical slasher you’re use to seeing. In five minutes it has already demonstrated an impressive and professional feel to it all, incorporating an orchestral soundtrack and a pretty picture, one I can’t complain about. It’s lead girl is a good behaved one, of course, and smart, sometimes. She isn’t written extremely well, though, which can also be said about anyone else in the film. To say the least, The House on Sorority Row is not too caring about its characters, but with that said, cares more than a lot of other slasher films around the time.

The killer, however, is provided with little background, and solely there to kill and creep out audiences. The film makes it a mystery as to who it is by only showing the weapon piercing its victim and what not, and by doing this sets up the whodunnit scenario. Although, with little suspects it’s unnecessary, especially towards its finale. With that being said, however, I genuinely did enjoy this film. It feels different and a tad more polished than others slashers at the time. It’s basically a revenge story, which I do admire from time to time. And that ending is all things creepy.

6.4/10

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