Scream Season 1 Review

Scream the TV series is MTV’s latest attempt at being a serious television channel, and while it is of course spooned by dramatic adult situations that poop out run-of-the-mill teenage conventions within its environment, it is surprisingly enjoyable. Now let’s rewind: MTV was solely created to showcase music videos during its initial run in the 80s. Flash forward thirty years and it’s now showing countless reality, comedy and drama programs, mainly targeted toward pre adults (like, what the fuck.). Teen Wolf, which is probably the pinnacle of MTV’s scripted programs is an ideal example of how the channel operates withing its serious TV shows (You should know that I ain’t hating on Teen Wolf right now, in fact, I’d go as far to say I love it. It’s both sophisticated and not.). To the technical elements of the show, the cinematography does a pretty great job at tweaking the MTV look, and it sure doesn’t look MTV, which is good. The music is overpowering at times and cheesy. To the actors – the cast is fairly good, with newcomers hindering from time to time. And to the story – it gets dramatic, and then it gets teenage dumb, with lovey-dubby periods interluding. So with that, MTV has its rather simple formula for creating a TV show that would be proud on any other channel. And funny enough, Scream the TV series borrows that equation.

It really should be essential to have seen horror mastermind Wes Craven’s masterpiece, Scream – or even to know about it – before seeing  the TV series. But I’ll go on a limb here and say that MTV really doesn’t give a fuck if they’re targeted audience have seen or are familiar with the franchise. There should be plenty out there though that do – just hopefully (Sadly, I really do think Scary Movie will fly into those unaccustomed minds). If you have seen Scream, then I do wish that like me, you will agree that it’s a wondrous and original splash of a horror film, and a must see for the genre (If not, we can talk later). But strangely, it’s given birth to a MTV developed television series. And it really isn’t connected to any events in the Scream franchise. And I really don’t know if any of the original crew are working on this one. It’s not a natural instinct to hop on when you hear the words: MTV. The series stands on its own two feet, and it just so happens to be controlled in a different direction.

The mask of the Ghostface killer is replaced with the Brandon James mask and the story behind this one is almost like a Halloween rip off. Known as the Lakewood psycho, Brandon James was a deformed killer who went on a murdering spree in 1994, killing five students. Twenty years later, a run of murders begin, scaring high school students in Lakewood shitless. Our Neve Campbell is Emma, who’s harassed by a handful of mysterious phone calls after the murder of her close friend, Nina, who’s also the high school’s class A bitch. You can guess that more surrounding Emma die in the hands of the psycho killer. But what I didn’t see coming was how much I would enjoy the series – disregarding its notable slip-ups, and not to mention my ability to guess the killer halfway through.

Screasm 2

The characters, thank fuck, are likable, with Emma being a fairly great lead and the one who’s apparent enough to be the final girl. Although she does have the tendency to make wrong choices that a final girl wouldn’t take here and there, she miraculously strides in the end and proves to be a compelling spark in the series. But in a film, it just wouldn’t happen. It’s a slow progress to wholly appreciate her as a potent character, which really can be said about any other character in the series, especially the long lasting dull ones. And as I recall their names, most of them are pretentious males. However, Noah Foster, the film and computer geek, is probably the best – I garnered a lot of smiles and laughs from the guy.

The side-plots are weak and uninteresting, and with a second season coming next year it’d be fucking great if they abandoned them, but it’s likely they won’t. They don’t serve real purpose, only act as filler, and what’s worse is they slow down the rest of the show – which isn’t good when it comes to a mystery series. It also seems that those associated with the side-plots are the weakest of characters, solely because they’re surrounded by a lackluster story, delaying their character development. The season’s finale nearly showcases each and everyone at the same level of appreciation, but may hinder with one or two.


VERDICT:

MTV has shown it can be both serious and seriously entertaining in the past years, however hackneyed its shows are. What they can do now is acknowledge that they have something other than Teen Wolf to parade about, and actually improve by giving us more ‘new’. 


Series Grade:

B minus


Best Episode: #10 Revelations”
Worst Episode : #5 “Exposed”


Episode Grades:

#1 “Pilot” – C+
#2 “Hello, Emma” – C+
#3 “Wanna Play a Game?” – B+
#4 “Aftermath” – B
#5 “Exposed” – D+
#6 “Betrayed” – C+
#7 “In the Trenches” – B
#8 “Ghosts” – B-
#9 “The Dance” – B
#10 “Revelations” – B+


If you like this, you might like:

Scream Franchise, Teen Wolf, MTV

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